Anna's Kitchen

Anna

Aug 16 2011 - 2:17pm

Sorting the Black Mission and Bright yellow green Calymyrna figs waiting to be poached, I was enveloped in memories of long summer evenings years ago. It was, what I would call the idyllic, and, therefore, very short period in my life--we lived at the end of a cul-de-sac on Mariposa Way, in Lodi, California for 18 months and just when it seemed that this would be a permanent paradise, my...

Feb 22 2016 - 10:13am

What do beer and bread have in common?—Fermentation by yeast. At least 30,000 years ago “bread” was discovered. Wheat and barley were among the first crops to be domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. Its cultivation was crucial in the transition from paleolithic man (hunter and gatherer) to become neolithic man(farmer).

About 10,000BC, the leavening of bread in Ancient Egypt, who also...

Feb 16 2016 - 9:59am

Neolithic man knew of fava and cultivated it in the Eastern Mediterranean Basin circa 6,500 BC. By the Bronze age, the easy growing protein rich and cold resistant plant had made its way across Europe and northern Africa. By the Medieval Age, fava, protein rich (32% RDA for iron, 42% RDA for folate, a good source of thiamine, vitamin K, B-6, potassium, selenium, zinc and magnesium), was the...

Feb 8 2016 - 9:48am

A “Traditional Food”, according to the European Parliament means that a food’s ingredients, composition, production or processing can be shown to be transmitted through generations. A food is considered “traditional” if it has been known “since before the Second World War”. (16-03-2006)

And so, a quick check on the history of eggplant and its nutritive value; a look up of regional...

Jan 26 2016 - 5:45am

Spelled variously, Tsatsiki, Satsiki, Tzatzik in Greece, this appetizer sauce which combines at its most common level, yogurt and cucumber, is recognizable in the cuisines of India, Iraq, Iran, Armenia, the Caucasus, Turkey and the Balkans. Cucumbers, a specie of the gourd plant, originating in the foothills of the Himalayans, most likely began its millennial pas de deux with yogurt during the...

Feb 1 2016 - 11:30am

In one variation of Greek Mythology, Athena, goddess of wisdom and war was competing with Poseidon, god of the sea, for the patronage of the growing Attica settlement: Poseidon struck the rock and a spring flowed, but it was salty water. Athena in turn touched the stoney ground and an olive tree grew. The olive tree was judged to be the more useful gift and the city became known as Athens....

Jan 19 2016 - 2:01am

According to statistics published in the HuffPost and elsewhere, Greeks eat more cheese per capita than any other country in the world. Why? Because Greeks eat Feta. Feta, one of the most recognizable Greek foods, actually got its name from the Italian "fetta" meaning, “slice” in the 1700's presumably from the practice of slicing the cheese in order to barrel and ship it. Ubiquitous on Greek...

Jan 11 2016 - 11:02pm

Pronounced, av-goe-LE-moe-noe, this classic Greek sauce is BOTH! Deriving its name from the two words, avgo' (egg) and lemo'ni (lemon), Avgolemono is made by whisking fresh eggs into which about the same amount of freshly squeezed lemon juice is streamed while continuously beating. Next hot stock twice the volume of the egg and lemon mixture is slowing whisked in as well and finally the egg-...